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February 17, 2014 / Roel

Grammar – Comparative and 3rd case

comparative

In the previous lesson we learned to compare things to eachother, but in order to really say something useful with a comparison, it is good to know the word for ‘than‘ in Dutch. ‘than‘ is ‘dan‘ in Dutch, it’s almost the same as in English. The use of this word is also very similar:

He’s bigger than me.

Hij is groter dan mij.

He learns more than me.

Hij leert meer dan mij.

me is the 3rd case of the personal pronoun in Dutch. Let’s take a look at it:

1st singular:      mij (me)

2nd singular:    jou (you)

3rd singular:     hem (him)/haar (her)

1st plural:            ons/onze (us)

2nd plural:           jullie (you)

3rd plural:            hun (them)

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February 17, 2014 / Roel

Grammar – Possessive pronouns

Possessive pronouns

The possessive pronouns are just like in English very easy, once you know them, you can always use them in the same way. The only irregularity is the word ‘us’ which is ons/onze. It depends on the word when you use ons or onze, but the rule is very regular:

het = ons

de = onze

our house = ons huis (het huis)

our friend = onze vriend (de vriend)

mijn – my

jouw – your

zijn/haar – his/her

ons/onze – our

jullie – your (plural)

February 11, 2014 / Roel

Lesson 8 – Vooruitgang

Tekst

Ik leer Nederlands en daarin maak ik vooruitgang. Mijn woordenschat wordt steeds groter. John leert ook Nederlands. Zijn Nederlands wordt beter en beter. Zijn grammatica is ook beter dan mijn grammatica. Zijn Engels is ook beter dan die van mij.

vocabulary:

maken = to make

ik maak (maken) = I make

daarin = in it, in there

vooruitgang = progress

woordenschat = vocabulary

groter = (groot = big)

zijn = his

beter = better

grammatica = grammar

dan = than

die van mij = mine

Possessive pronouns

The possessive pronouns are just like in English very easy, once you know them, you can always use them in the same way. The only irregularity is the word ‘us’ which is ons/onze. It depends on the word when you use ons or onze, but the rule is very regular:

het = ons

de = onze

our house = ons huis (het huis)

our friend = onze vriend (de vriend)

 

mijn – my

jouw – your

zijn/haar – his/her

ons/onze – our

jullie – your (plural)

comparative

In the previous lesson we learned to compare things to eachother, but in order to really say something useful with a comparison, it is good to know the word for ‘than‘ in Dutch. ‘than‘ is ‘dan‘ in Dutch, it’s almost the same as in English. The use of this word is also very similar:

He’s bigger than me.

Hij is groter dan mij.

He learns more than me.

Hij leert meer dan mij.

 

me is the 3rd case of the personal pronoun in Dutch. Let’s take a look at it:

1st singular:      mij (me)

2nd singular:    jou (you)

3rd singular:     hem (him)/haar (her)

1st plural:            ons/onze (us)

2nd plural:           jullie (you)

3rd plural:            hun (them)

From now on, some words will be in Dutch because we know the Dutch words for vocabulary and grammar now.

February 11, 2014 / Roel

Grammar – Comparisons

good – better – best

In order to say that something will be increased or has increased the most, you use a technique which is simpler than English.

In long words in English you say:

interesting

more interesting

most interesting

In Dutch we just add -er to indicate that there is more of the property of something and -st to indicate that the property of something is in it’s maximum, just like in English short words, but in Dutch we always use this.

Let’s take our English word, ‘interesting‘.

interesting is ‘interessant‘ in Dutch.

interessant = interesting

interessanter = more interesting

interessantst = most interesting

There are exceptions of course. Some of the most important are:

goed = good

beter = better

best = best

graag = really want

liever = prefer

liefst = most liked

If you use it as an adjective, you add an -e, which will give you either -ere or -ste.

De interessante man = the interesting man

De interessantere man = the more interesting man

De interessantste man = the most interesting man

words which contain -r as an ending, will often use -d.

Example:

zuur = sour

zuurder = more sour

Words which contain -s as an ending, will have a change of the ‘s‘ in ‘z‘ when you use this. This has to do with pronunciaton, it’s easier to pronounce the word if you use z. The -st part is replaced by the English way, you use the word ‘meest’, which means ‘most’.

A good example is the word ‘grijs’.

grijs – grey

grijzer – more grey

meest grijs – most grey

If you would say ‘grijser’, it takes longer for your mouth to pronounce it, z gives the word a better flow.

October 13, 2013 / Roel

Lesson 7 – Een les leren

Tekst

John leert Nederlands. Vandaag leert hij een les, omdat hij graag de taal beter onder de knie wil krijgen.

Als John de les geleerd heeft, wil hij met een vriend ergens naartoe. Daar hebben zij veel zin in.

 

Vocabulary:

de les = the lesson

graag = really want(s) (this word is used in Dutch to indicate something which you really like or want)

beter = better

onder de knie krijgen = to be able to do something in the future, this can’t be translated literally

als = if, when

de vriend = the friend

ergens = somewhere

naartoe = to

daar = in this context: in that thing

zin hebben in = to enjoy, to like

zij hebben zin in = they really enjoy to

 

grammar

 

good – better – best

 

In order to say that something will be increased or has increased the most, you use a technique which is simpler than English.

In English you say:

interesting

more interesting

most interesting

 

In Dutch we just add -er to indicate that there is more of the property of something and -st to indicate that the property of something is in it’s maximum.

Let’s take our English word, interesting.

interesting is ‘interessant‘ in Dutch.

interessant = interesting

interessanter = more interesting

interessantst = most interesting

 

There are exceptions of course. Some of the most important are:

 

goed = good

beter = better

best = best

 

graag = really want

liever = prefer

liefst = most liked

 

 

 

If you use it as an adjective, you add an -e, which will give you either -ere or -ste.

De interessante man = the interesting man

De interessantere man = the more interesting man

De interessantste man = the most interesting man

 

words which contain -r as an ending, will often use -d.

Example:

zuur = sour

zuurder =

 

Words which contain -s as an ending, will have a change of the ‘s‘ in ‘z‘ when you use this. This has to do with pronunciaton, it’s easier to pronounce the word if you use z. The -st part is replaced by the English way, you use the word ‘meest’, which means ‘most’.

A good example is the word ‘grijs’.

grijs – grey

grijzer – more grey

meest grijs – most grey

 

If you would say ‘grijser’, it takes longer for your mouth to pronounce it, z gives the word a better flow.

 

October 2, 2013 / Roel

Grammar – The word ‘er’

Er

The word ‘er‘ in Dutch is a word with different meanings. In the first place it means ‘there‘, the word ‘er‘ refers to a place here. You can say for instance:

Ben je er? = Are you there?

It’s a shorter way to say: ‘Ben je daar’

Furthermore, er is used to say if something is present. It is used as ‘er zijn‘, which means ‘there are‘. You can also say: ‘er is‘, which means ‘there is‘.

Er zijn veel boeken = There are a lot of books

Er is een pagina = There is a page

er‘ can also be used to refer to a situation in which something is wrong:

Wat er is weet ik ook niet. = I don’t know neither what’s going on.

Weet jij er iets aan te doen = Do you know something what we can do about it?

‘er’ can be used too when counting. If you have 2 pages, you say:

Ik heb 2 pagina’s         – I have 2 pages

You can change this into: Ik heb er 2          – I have  2 of them

In this case, ‘er‘ is still having the function of indicating a place, because it refers to the pages which are present somewhere. The difference is that it’s not clear where they are, but ‘er‘ is a referer to a place again.

Another use of ‘er‘ can be with a preposition.

Heb je het gegeven? – Ja, ik heb er een van gegeven.

Have you given it? – Yes, I have given one of it.

September 30, 2013 / Roel

Lesson 6 – In de bibliotheek

Tekst

 

In de bibliotheek zijn heel veel boeken. Er zijn boeken over allerlei onderwerpen en veel mensen komen er om een boek te lenen.

 

Vocabulary:

de bibliotheek = the library

heel = very

veel = much / a lot

er zijn = there are

over = about

allerlei = all kind(s)

het onderwerp = the subject

er = there

om (te) = to, in order to

lenen = to lend

 

Grammar

 

Er

The word ‘er‘ in Dutch is a word with different meanings. In the first place it means ‘there‘, the word ‘er‘ refers to a place here. You can say for instance:

Ben je er? = Are you there?

It’s a shorter way to say: ‘Ben je daar’

 

Furthermore, er is used to say if something is present. It is used as ‘er zijn‘, which means ‘there are‘. You can also say: ‘er is‘, which means ‘there is‘.

 

Er zijn veel boeken = There are a lot of books

Er is een pagina = There is a page

 

er‘ can also be used to refer to a situation in which something is wrong:

 

Wat er is weet ik ook niet. = I don’t know neither what’s going on.

Weet jij er iets aan te doen = Do you know something what we can do about it?

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 23, 2013 / Roel

Vocabulary lessons 1 – 5

hallo = hello       (a like in ‘after‘)

ik = I

ik heet = I ‘m called         (ee like a in ‘page‘)

dit = this

is = is

hij = he              (ij like    e + i, e like ‘a’ in ‘and‘ and i like ee in ‘feedback )

hij woont = he lives

hier = here          (ie like ee in ‘feedback‘)

sinds = since

maanden = months     ( e like e in ‘pages‘ )

maand = month

ik spreek (spreken) = I speak   irregular

al = already

een = a, an

beetje = bit

Nederlands = Dutch

maar = but

het = it

moeilijk(e) = difficult, hard

de taal = the language

ik leer (leren) = I learn (to learn)  regular verb

wordt (worden) = in this context: is      otherwise: to become   irregular verb

gesproken    = spoken (past tense)

in                     = in

en                    = and

lijkt op (lijken op) = looks like (to look like)        irregular verb

Engels            = English

nu                    = now

Nederland     = the Netherlands

ik kom (komen)     = I come (to come)         irregular verb

uit                       = this context: from          other meaning: out

vandaag = today

het boek = the book

gekocht (kopen) = bought (to buy)

ik wil (willen) = I want (to want)

volgende = next

de week = the week

lezen = to read

omdat = because

nog = still

veel = a lot

doen = to do

nog veel te doen hebben = having a lot to do

het weekend = the weekend

belangrijk = important

groot = big

het huis = the house

September 23, 2013 / Roel

Grammar – Adjectives

Adjectives

In Dutch you have adjectives like ‘volgende‘. You can use it in two forms: ‘volgend‘ and ‘volgende‘.

Which one you have to use depends on the article which you use before the adjective.

de = volgende

het = volgend(e)

When you use the word ‘het‘ you can often use both ‘volgende‘ and ‘volgend‘. Some examples:  Het volgend weekend, het volgend examen, het volgend jaar.

Volgend without “e” is often used to indicate something what will happen in the near future.

Volgende however is always correct. So you can always use: het volgende weekend, het volgende examen, het volgende jaar, but it is also used to emphasize something.

volgend weekend = next weekend

het volgende weekend = it’s in the next weekend, not in another weekend

if you use the indefinite article “een“, you always use the adjective without “e“.

Example:

an important year/the important year:

een belangrijk jaar

het belangrijke jaar

a big house/the big house:

een groot huis

het grote huis

Why the double “oo” changes in “o” is already explained in a previous lesson.

 

important rules!!

Adjectives:

de/het = -e

een = not using -e

September 23, 2013 / Roel

Lesson 5 – Een boek lezen

Tekst

 

Vandaag heb ik een boek gekocht. Ik wil het boek volgende week lezen, omdat ik nog veel te doen heb.

 

Vocabulary:

vandaag – today

het boek – the book

gekocht (kopen) – bought (to buy)

ik wil (willen) – I want (to want)

volgende – next

de week – the week

lezen – to read

omdat – because

nog – still

veel – a lot

doen – to do

nog veel te doen hebben – having a lot to do

 

Grammar:

 

Adjectives

In Dutch you have adjectives like ‘volgende‘. You can use it in two forms: ‘volgend‘ and ‘volgende‘.

Which one you have to use depends on the article which you use before the adjective.

de = volgende

het = volgend(e)

When you use the word ‘het‘ you can often use both ‘volgende‘ and ‘volgend‘. Some examples:  Het volgend weekend, het volgend examen, het volgend jaar.

Volgend without “e” is often used to indicate something what will happen in the near future.

Volgende however is always correct. So you can always use: het volgende weekend, het volgende examen, het volgende jaar, but it is also used to emphasize something.

volgend weekend = next weekend

het volgende weekend = it’s in the next weekend, not in another weekend

if you use the indefinite article “een“, you always use the adjective without “e“.

Example:

an important year/the important year:

een belangrijk jaar

het belangrijke jaar

a big house/the big house:

een groot huis

het grote huis

Why the double “oo” changes in “o” is already explained in a previous lesson.

Vocabulary:

het weekend = the weekend

belangrijk = important

groot = big

het huis = the house

important rules!!

Adjectives:

de/het = -e

een = not using -e

Vocabulary: 15 new words = total vocabulary of 56 words